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" opening my mail i came across a press release from the library announcing for $10 million it but america's birth certificate, the waldseemuller map, the map that gave america its name and the $10 million was the most elaborate spent on anything and $2 million more than was recently paid for the original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention and i never heard of or saw the map and the library thought it was worth it and the market thought it was worth more than the declaration of independence and i thought maybe i would do an article or short piece for the atlantic. so i did research and got the basics of the story, pretty quickly. early in the 1500, the eastern part of france, in the mountains, there was a small group of scholars, among them, the map maker, martin waldseemuller and that he came by letters, and an early sailor's chart showing the coastline of the new world and decided that what they were reading about and seeing on the charts of asia, as most people assumed it was but it was a new continent, people traditionally thought of the world as
for $10 million a but what it called americans for certification, the map the gave america its name. vechten million dollars was the most diverse finn on anything. it was almost $2 million more than had recently been paid for an original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention. i had never heard of the map, had never seen a map but the library seemed to think it was the most valuable piece in the market seemed to think was more than the original copy of the declaration of independence, so i wanted to find out more and at this point i was thinking maybe i would do a short piece for the clint. so i did some research and got the basics of the story pretty quickly. early in the 1500's in the eastern part of france there was a small group of scholars. among them map maker martin waldseemuller and they came across-- y emir guo vespucci in the chart lines of the new world and they decided that what they were reading about in saying on these charts was not a part of asia as most people had assumed it was but in fact was a new continent. people traditionally
america. this is the last critical piece of the puzzle you need to understand. and you need to understand why it's being done, and how they're doing it. but first, let me share good news with you. i don't know if you've heard it yet but president obama decided to fulfill his campaign promise. giving clearly eight times to put the health care debate and all negotiations on c-span. due to mounting pressure announcing today he will open up the health care debate to the american public and broadcast the congressional proceedings on the bill on c-span. for one full hour. i call that an info meshl. that should be plenty of time to fill in citizens on every detail of the 2500 page bill, don't you think? they'll need the bill that will fundamentally transform the republic. and they'll say this president doesn't listen to the little people. get ready for an important hour helping you understand what, why, and how progress yifz are changing the structure of the nation. >> i want to start with a personal note. by the way hello, america. i don't know if i've ever told you why i believe some of the th
is really happening in america. come on, let's go. hello, america. hope and change. it was a movement that surged barack obama into the white house. but it is not the first time america has seen this sort ofer political uprising of hope and change and progress. there was hope and change wayne back in the early 20th century but the name was different. different. it was progressivism. you heard that before. are you a progressive? it was the shiny new car. well, now wait a minute, what happened? well, back in the early 20th century, everybody wanted to take it for a spin. progressivism had no political boundaries. the democrats like woodrow wilson loved it. republicans, teddy roosevelt, loved it. america was stuck in a rut. we needed to make progress. how better to break free than to use progressive tactics? the message resonated with so many americans and progressives began winning elections. and then, they started to govern. that's where the problem came in. in the response to the repeated bank runs in the early 1900s, progressives came up with an idea. the federal reserve system. this
america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge, thank you for joining us. it was an attack so damaging that one former intelligence official described it as the cia's pearl harbor. we're talking about the suicide bombing yesterday that killed eight americans, some of them cia employees. today a spokesman for the taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. saying a bomber entered the base last night and blew himself up. it was the worst loss for the cia since the war there began more than eight years ago. yesterday's attack took place at a remote outpost known as chapman in the province of khost, along the border with pakistan. this evening the associated press is reporting that the suicide bomber was invited on to the base by americans. according to a former senior intelligence official, the man was being courted as an informants and it was the first time he had been brought inside the camp. he was reportedly not searched. much of the cia's efforts in that region including drone attacks had been focused on the
, to fundamentally transform america. our economy, our healthcare system. our partisan political ways. it has been a year since barack obama took the oath of office. sometimes his decisions as president have contradicted his promises as candidate. he even appears to be continuing some policies he once called mistakes. in many area, however, he has made more than good on his promise to change. fundamentally change our country. for some, obama is exactly the president he said he would be. for others, he is not. for voters, it often depends on what they thought they heard. tonight, a unique hour, the story of barack obama's campaign and first year in office in a way it hasn't been told before. in his own words. we begin with one of the biggest promises candidate obama made. to repair america's image around the world. so has president obama restored the united states prestige for damaged it with apologies? listen. >> i will restore our moral standing so that america is, once again, that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama embarks on his first european swin
america, our economy, our healthcare system, our partisan political ways. it has been a year since barack obama took the oath of office. sometimes his decisions as president have contradicted his promises as candidate. he even appears to be continuing some policies he once called mistakes. in many areas he has more than good made on his promise to change. fund amount fally change our country. obama for some he is exactly the president he said he would be, for others he is not. for voters it depends on what they thought they heard. tonight a unique hour. his campaign in a way that hasn't been told before in his own words. ee begin with one of the biggest promises he made to repair our image around the world. has president obama restored the united states prestige or damaged it with apologies? listen. (cheers) >> i will restore our moral standing so america is once again that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama em barks on the first european swing focused on the languishing glowing economy. >> if you look at the source of this crisis the united
to the glenn beck program. i'm judge andrew napolitano. tonight, glen looks at the takeover of america and more. all week he has been closing the case on arguments he made last year. the first segment of last night's show was interrupted by breaking news out of the white house. we wanted to play it for you in the entirety. the last critical piece of the puzzle, you need to understand what is being done. why it's being done. and how they're doing it. ♪ ♪ >> i want to start with a personal note. hello, america. i don't know if i've ever told you why i believe some of the things that i do or how i began my journey into believing what i do. it's funny the uber left tries to discredit me calling me a conspiracy theorist, because i've always made fun of conspiracy people. sometimes there are conspiracies and sometimes it's plain out in the open and you have to be willing to look at it. conspiracies aren't conspiracies when they're true and open. we have been closing the case this week on all of the things that we talked about last year. because we have to move on. we can't still sit here and say
of campaigns. >> we might back up and explain proportional representation. it is not well understood in america at all. >> it is not. the quickest explanation is it produces multi-party democracy. >> some time to many parties like in italy -- not in ireland, that is proportional, but it actually has three. >> you can fine-tune your democracy by setting what you call a victory threshold. how many parties. in the unites the states with a system that is democrat or republican in many districts and most districts are so non- competitive we can tell you who will wind. >> in short hand, first past the post. >> winner-take-all. >> it has worked very well in the uk. periodically the labour party says it will go to proportional representation and then they realized they may lose some of the viability and backs off it. there are a lot of use of europe and america that it is old, that it is bureaucratic beyond belief, that it is overtaxed, that people don't work hard enough, that it is not competitive, that for its defense it relies on us and that it is just as far down the track of having it manufacturin
'll want to learn all about it. many say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the world at large. the best military report and military expert in the country tom ricks joins me to tell you about it. >>> while most of the focus of the nation and this show is on the hot spots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we'll talk to the famous scholar, kishore mahbubahni of singapore to get a different perspective on the world. let's get started. >>> all day long on cable, news talk shows we hear about how president obama is doing. on fox some say he's a socialist who's trying to indoctrinate our children, even as he mortgages their future. on msnbc he is the lonely hero fighting to give help to the sick, employ the jobless and end racism in our time. here on cnn, well, i'm on cnn, so today i want to see if we can get some kind of a clear-eyed look at what kind of a president he really is and what kind of a world he faces. so i gathered a panel of talented historians and writers. people who know greatness and the lack thereof when they see it to help m
say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the war at large. the best military report, military expert in the country, tom bricks, joins me to tell you about it. while much of the focus of the nation and the show is on the hotspots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we will talk with the famous international writer and scholar of singapore to get a very different perspective on the world. let's get started. >>> all day long on cable, news talk shows, we hear about how president obama's doing. on fox, some say he's a socialist trying tune doctrine eight our children even as he mortgages their future. on msnbc, the lonely hero fighting to give help to the sick and employ the jobless and end racism in our time. and here on cnn, i'm on cnn, i wanted to see if we could get a clear look at what kind of a president he really is. what kind of a world he faces. i gathered panel of talented historians and writers. people who know greatness and the lack thereof when they see it help me accomplish this mission. walter isaacson has written terrific biographi
that america's competitive advantage is in financial products and financial engineering. and that these banks do produce a lot of foreign armies for the u.s. and if we start really knocking down wall street, which is getting competitive advantage to the germans, british, japanese or whoever, i don't agree with that. but you know, i think it underlies a lot of the reluctance of the administration to really get to too tough with wall street that they say it's like yesterday was good for general motors is good for america. now it's what's good for goldman sachs is good for america. not necessary goal but because they are so unpopular. but what's good for jpmorgan chase is good for america. >> no line has been drawn. there's been no edition. basically mathematics. so therefore says that as it may be, deficit. since we are tiptoeing past the cemetery nobody wants to do the math. >> there are some people, the argument here is that banks haven't dealt with a bad debt problem. they're still sitting on their balance sheet so we will end up like japan presumably. i think there is very respected people,
not be manufacturing the way we are. that is about the only thing made in america still are . the number one thing may be that these are a bunch of stupid young kids remember when issue was to legalize marijuana. it is now legal in california and new jersey. you can now get in 1 ounce a month if you have cancer or aids. the drugs are not all horrible. most of the horrible drugs are manufactured by are pharmaceutical companies and people abuse them. guest: the drug issue is very complicated. it is supply and demand for it is one that neither the europeans or the americans or latin americans have been able to come to grips with are the drugs are having a big effect in latin america. this was not true 20 years ago. we will not resolve this overnight. we need to focus on the issue now that the mexican society is bleeding very badly. united states needs to be concerned about that. secretary of state clinton said this last year. host: a dealer is asking if cuba got an earthquake like haiti, would we be there to rebuild a communist regime? guest: that is an issue of helping out a country that has terrible pr
. ♪ ♪ >> glenn: hello, america. i'm going to get to all the news of the day, there is plenty of time for the white house to call. call me anytime. just correct anything we say. but they're not going to yet again today. this year, i told you, this show is going to be different. and so why we are going to get to the news, i want to explain the approach of this program for the next few months, 12 months maybe. last year all i tried to do is figure out what the heck is going on. i was up all the time. got two or three hours of sleep on some nights. most nights in fact. because i was reading, trying to figure it out. trying to figure out what are they doing? we figured it out together last year. this year i decided that the only way to move forward and to fix it is just to remember who we are as americans. learn and remember where we came from. more importantly, correct the history that progressives have tried to erase. friday night, we showed you the history of communist revolutionaries. th that's not topped. we got ratings a while ago and it was the number one show on cable news on frid
't for sea sickness, everyone should like to be a sailor. duty was to map the coastline of south america. and so we proceeded down the coast, and on the way, i dredged the sea with nets and i collected specimens along the shore, wore a hat like this one and every day, just after the sailors had finished swabbing the deck, i would load it up with hundreds of new specimens to be sorted and labeled. they soon became distinctly air aromatic in the equatorial sun. one sailor asked me, mr. darwin, would you mind getting that stinking pile of ripe refuse off my deck? stinking pile of refuse. but there are so many wonderful things here. ♪ some day people will pay just to see them on display, at the british museum ♪ ♪ i've dug in the ground and these rocks that i found have the features of creatures no longer around ♪ ♪ here are trilobyte beds by the ton ♪ ♪ what a glorious day, what a wonderful way to have fun ♪ ♪ i've searched by the shore and collected some more ♪ ♪ worms and star wish and gar fish and gobies galore ♪ i've got shark eggs and sea weed and slime ♪ ♪
policy toward latin america with a political science professor. and then a conversation on the future of the hybrid and electric car industry. "washington journal" is next. . . . the president's efforts to give the economy on track. that is this morning from "the washington post." the report breaking this morning about a plane crashed in the route, "the new york times" online have the story about the airplane crashing near beirut in stormy weather. officials said that 82 passengers and eight crew members were on board. we will update the information as we get it. ruth, democratic line. caller: i am not quite sure if we ever did what we were promising. to try and help people who were in trouble with their mortgages. i think that we took the wrong approach to begin with. so many people that were out of their homes. the fact ripples through the economy. -- the of fact ripples through the economy. let's help -- bethe effedctct te riffles through the economy. if the loan was renegotiated to what it was really worth, they can afford it, but the communication that happening. ho
for $10 million ahead of what it called america's birth certificate. the math that gave america its name. that $10 million was the most the library had ever spent on anything. it was also almost $2 million more than had recently been paid for an original copy of the declaration of independence, and that kind of caught my attention. i never heard of the map or had seen the map but the library seemed to think it was the most valuable piece and the market even seemed to think it was more than an original copy of the declaration of independence. so, i wanted to find out more and at this point i was thinking maybe i would do an article, short piece for the alana tech. so i did some research and got the basics of the story pretty quickly. early in the 1500's in the eastern part of france in the mountains there was a small group of scholars among them the mapmaker martin and he had come across letters and at least one early sailors chart showing the coastlines of the new world and they decided that what they were reading about and see on the charts was not a part of asia as most people had assu
., and the chairman and ceo of bmw north america. "washington journal" take your calls and e-mails live every morning here on c-span. . >> this is 50 minutes. >> good morning everybody. the a pleasure to welcome you here today. this is the first event we are having in our new conference room, and we hope to headache it a good one. i get to say a few words about the bipartisan policy center before we get into the real action. we were founded on the idea that people with significantly different views and who have strong allegiance to different parties could still come together and try to design serious and substantive solution toss address the nation's big challenges. we are not a think tank in the traditional sense. we only study things for a purpose. and when our projects come together, people understand they are going to spend as much time advocate fog a particular solution as constructing it. i think it's fair to say that the project we are launching today will very much test the proposition of bringing people together towards a substantive and detailed solution, and will test our ability to advoca
the seasickness, everyone should like to be a sailer. our duty was to map the coastline of south america. and so we proceeded down the coast, and on the way i dredged the sea with the nets, and i collected specimens along the shore. i wore a hat like this one. everyday just after the sailors had finished swabbing the deck i would loaded up with hundreds of of new specimens to be sorted and labeled. this they soon became distinctly aromatic in the ecuadorean sun. in fact i remember a sailor asked me, mr. darwin, would you mind getting that stinking pile of refuse of my deck? sticking pile of refuse? there are so many wonderful things here. someday people will pay just to see them on display at the british museum. ♪ i've dug in the ground, and these rocks that have found have the features of creatures no longer around. there are trilobites by the ton. what a glorious day. what a wonderful way to have fun. ♪ i've searched by the shore and collected some more worms and starfish and garfish and kolbe's galore. i have got shark heads and some seaweed and slime. i am having the loveliest this time.
. in some will show this has been like behind in america. strangely enough today i found it rasmussen poll through september show wayne favorability ratings for various professions. small-business owners those who start their own business are ring to #1 and number two. they are doing fine but the ceo is second to last. outside the entrepreneurial circle is not seen favorably as of -- at all in america. the good news the very last category is members of congress. [laughter] what i found to be the most finding it at all our people randomly selected from the phone book to do a better job than congress. but our guest today michael medved takes away the misconception of business head on in his book, it "the 5 big lies about american business." mr. medved is a premier political commentator hosting a daily talk show that has 5 million listeners each day. also a veteran film critic and an ex liberal at one time working for the left-of-center congressman from california and talk about your unpopular profession, he also came close to being a lawyer to the yale law school with bill clinton and hillar
news. they even got a big contract. to help bring out gold in latin america. a winner, not a loser. i don't want you selling any of that. now, mohammed ali. time to file away the past as the immortal spice girls said. i'm kind of like -- which spice am i like most? moron spice. the market's throwing a sale. you should be shopping for sales. not run away from them. "mad money" will be right back. >>> coming up, catching fire? as the detroit auto show kicks into high gear, people are asking what will fuel the cars of the future? cramer goes one on one with clean energy fuel ceo to find out on the executive decision. >>> plus, job start. not all auto suppliers are created equal. cramer takes three for a test drive and pits their fundamentals against the technicals to pick a winner. on an all new "off the charts." >> later, stay tuned as we crank up the volume. cramer goes all out as the calls keep coming in. try to keep up on a high impact "lightning round." all coming up on "mad money." what are you doing...? calling chase sapphire, seeing if we have enough points to stay longer. now? y
, transformed latin america, eastern europe and asia, that created stable prosperous democracies was the middle-class is in those countries that were dependent on earth and were integrated into the global economy. and we don't think that in the muslim world you're not going to get them to where brazil, argentina, taiwan, or could we are unless the same classic got them to where they are also becomes empowered in the muslim world. so we look inward for a solution in the muslim world, without looking at what is the force that supposed to produce blue shin. i think the change agent and the muslim world ultimately will have to come from the middle-class and from the capitalist business sector associated with it. >> author of forces of fortune. thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is a pleasure to evacuate his magnificent building, this 18th century library, which i think it's one of the architectural models of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop
america such night took to the british the whole story, laid it all out for them, lock stock and barrel but by 1989 gorbachev's harbor was beginning to raise. fewer call, president george w. bush met with gorbachev in december, a few months after the defect or on ships at that summit there was no mention of biological weapons at all. to one of the reasons was of course that bush was afraid to bring it up. it will blow up everything else to do was working on, the unification of germany within nato, strategic arms control and gorbachev didn't want to bring it up because of all she knew about the defector. he also realized that talk about biological weapons program on his watch would cause the world to us and questions about new thinking. so there was a little bit of a conspiracy of silence, but the soviet leadership worried terribly about how to respond if they got asked questions. and this continued to envelop or bischoff and bringing in his top advisers including foreign minister and the numerous meetings in the spring about how to respond and they finally decided to forgive any questio
and we will talk to jason deparle about poverty in america and the economy. from the nation's capital, this is " washington journal." host: the supreme court ruled 5- 4 to allow corporations to spend as much as the want to support or oppose individual candidates. the ruling is likely to also allow labor unions to send unlimited funds. the justices kept in place, though, a century old ban on corporate donations directly to any one candidate. let us kickoff today's " washington journal" talking about the supreme court decision. the phone lines -- send us a tweet at c-spanwj or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. "the washington post" on this story. the court also overturned a ban on corporations and unions airing campaign ads in the 30 days before primary and 60 days before a general election. also in "the washington post" this morning they talk about the reaction on capitol hill. inside "the washington post" its quotes senator charles schumer -- bound to push for new restrictions on corporate political spending, including limits for companies with government contracts, sharehold
to add more people to america's no-fly list. >> these reforms will improve the ability to collect, integrate, and act on intelligence affectively. >> travelers should expect more delays and security screening as a result, specifically wider use of high-tech body scanners. >> we should accelerate this technology so we have greater capability to detect explosives likes the ones used -- like the ones used in the attempted attack. we are already scheduled to deploy 300 more. we made deploying more than that. >> these are nervous times. and later jets is courted one plane back to an airport in oregon because of a destructive passenger. officials said there was no known terrorists and link but it is a sign of how skittish this attack has made america. thousands of miles away yemeni officials revealed they nigerian man accused of that attempt may have met with a known u.s.-born radical cleric and members of al qaeda. but if the terrorist network is so widespread and diverse, kendeigh is a new measures really keep americans saved? -- can these measures keep america safe? >> there is no fo
," fernandez that the price of gasoline are not the only problems for america's love of cars. ms. lutz fernandez speaks for 30 minutes in new canaan, connecticut. >> thank you, hello. welcome. and first of all i'd like to thank elm street books and the new canaan library for inviting me to speak tonight and thank you for coming to tonight. my name is anne lutz fernandez. i wanted to share with you initially just our decision to write the book, where that came from. and it really all happened just a few miles from here at my home in norwalk over thanksgiving weekend about four years ago. my sister and i were there. our family had gathered. and from various points driven, of course, to norwalk and my driveway was filled with cars. and spent a beautiful weekend celebration together. but invariably as had happened in the past prior few years, the conversation turned to the loss of our cousin christie in a car crash. and shortly after we lost christie, i lost a good friend in a highway crash. and these two losses had a profound affect on our lives. and we started chewing on the contradictio
revelation of the identities of murder erred asians. where america stands on food safety. how do we stack up against other countries and how do we prevent the most vulnerable americans from becoming dangerously ill? >> it got worse and worse, and it felt like killer pain. >> glor: and dashboard distractions, will the next generation of in car gadgets lure drivers into taking their eyes off the road? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with jeff glor. >> glor: good evening, the new year has been a cold year for most americans and this weekend is no exception. a deep-freeze is forecast to engulf virtually all of the continental united states overnight. the south is particularly ill prepared for such bone chilling weather. mark strassmann is in atlanta tonight. mark, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, jeff. it was 12 degrees outside here first thing this morning, but with the windchill it felt like one degree above zero, very unsouthern but remember every state but hawaii has been experiencing freezing temperatures, it is just that some people feel it more than othe
," has died. and where america stands in the battle against cancer. >> they tell you you have six months and what are you going to do in six months? >> couric: finding hope and cracking the genetic code. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. millions of vehicles recalled, sales suspended, production stopped, and just when you thought it couldn't get any worse for toyota, it has. the recall for defective gas pedals has spread to china and europe, and in this country, jeff glor tells us, another million-plus toyota cares and s.u.v.s were added to the recall list. >> reporter: for the world's biggest automaker, the problem seems to get bigger every day. as millions of toyota owners wonder if the vehicles they're driving are safe. >> i would really hate to be on the highway and then just be anything at a top-rate speed and not be able to control the vehicle. >> reporter: the latest recall involves five models. toyota said today they're closing in on solutions to a gas pe
. what is our policy currently in latin america and how different is it from the bush administration? >> we really don't have a policy to latin america. that is not a fault of the obama administration. the euna states needs universal bilateral policies in certain regions. there are many long past policies for the night states -- the united states need to direct -- differentiate among different countries in the hemisphere. we have different priorities now. we are slow in washington on the hill and in the white house to come to that understanding. host: what is the political landscape in latin america? how has the landscape changed politically down there? guest: there is a much more diverse ideological group of countries such as venezuela and ecuador and bolivia which are not very friendly to the united states or to the market economy. on the other hand, we have a prpragmatic president likelula in central america. we have the problem of cuba and we have a terrible problem with haiti. host: on the issue of haiti, there is an article about a question of commitment and can the united stat
little rock. nebraska road graders made in north america will have a north little rock tag on it. and the future of our country -- we will have a current -- census. by the middle of the century of looks like we will be pushing somewhere in the neighborhood of a half a billion folks spirit are tracked -- billion folks. we are excited about the innovation the administration is looking at in terms of reprivatizing funding. . >> thank you, thanks for all your leadership in arkansas. as i said, the president, vice- president and other members of the cabinet will be making some announcements about high-speed rail. there have been some very strong proposals from many different regions around the country on high-speed rail. high-speed rail is coming to america and is coming to america because of the $8 billion, which is a billion times more than we have ever had at dot because of president obama's vision and vice-president biden's vision on this. they have that inserted in the economic recovery plan because they know that is what americans want. i think when you see the role out of the h
. and that was very simple -- to restore the middle-class in america. look, because of the president's bold leadership, we weathered the most ferocious economic storm this nation has seen since the great depression, keeping us from sliding into a depression, as some leading economists suggested. the president, from the outset, has understood that it's all about jobs. but there's a lot of business to attend to, just to keep us from sliding off the edge. well, ladies and gentlemen, the president knows one other thing -- it's more than about jobs. a job is more than a paycheck. it's about dignity, and it's about respect, and too many people have lost it! ladies and gentlemen, president obama understands that the longest walk a mother or father can make is the trip up a short flight of stairs to their child's bedroom to say, "honey, i'm sorry, you're not going to be able to stay at stewart middle school next year," or "you can't play on west tampa's little league next year, honey. we're going to have to move," because mommy or daddy lost their job or because the bank said we can't keep our house. my dad m
the democracy journal. now i would like to introduce philip longman of the new america's foundation. >> [inaudible] so i'm going to talk about the american veterans experience with agent orange, and before i do i just want to say right off that despite my appearance and actually a little too young to have been in the vietnam war. i missed it by a year, so i say that so nobody will confuse me with a draft doctor or a vietnam veteran who's got attitude. if i go into a rage i'm doing it on behalf of veterans, not because i am one. the other somewhat complicating factor for me today is as paul mentioned i am the author of this book, "best care anywhere why the v.a. health care is better than yours." and i have ownership of that book. it's coming out in a second edition. i still stand by what it says, which essentially is the va, despite its mixed reputation, has undergone a quality revolution that has a lot to teach about reforming the rest of the health care system. thank you. but the va does have problems, and when it comes to agent orange, many of those problems are very revealed, an
teacher america folks participate in teacher u. i'd like to just talk a little bit about how we approach this work. we have a textbook that we've developed that we use with our core members called teaching as leadership. we're releasing a version actually this month or early this month that we're hoping to sort of share that knowledge that we've accumulated by looking at our exceptional teachers more broadly and really just enter into a conversation with people in this sector about what we can do to better prepare and support teachers in general. and one of the things that we focus on that we found in our high performers is their ability to invest students in their work. and, you know, chubb says in his paper students begin lessons unmotivated, they will simply not make the hard effort necessary to learn. agreed. i mean, i couldn't agree more. but i'm not sure that technology will motivate students. i mean, and i'm not sure how you get students to engage in the technology if they have this past of not being successful and don't feel like they want to engage in the work and doubt their ow
into international investment. >> i don't like america's team. >> caller: at least in part because the business climate is better in those countries than it is in the united states. >> right. >> caller: but my question is, if other countries are so much more attractive and business friendly than the united states currently, should we have even greater 20% --? >> i waffle over this. 20% is foreign. 10% is gold. that leaves 70% for united states. i am not giving up on this country. we have a lot of great values. remember, many of the s&p stocks and most of the dow stocks are international companies. they will take advantage of exactly what you're talking about. 20% overseas is very high. probably the highest of any money manager i know. that's how far i'm going and not a percent further. i need to go to mitch in south carolina, which i call carolina. mitch? >> caller: hi, jim. got a big-time boo-yah from charleston, south carolina. >> man, you've got that charleston university boo-yah. everyone's crazy about that school. go ahead. >> caller: -- around $40 a share just before the recent push. curr
." >> this is "bbc world news." we will make amends -- promise from one of america's security chiefs. president obama pins the blame on u.s. intelligence for the failed christmas day bombing. >> when a suspected terrorist is able to board a plane with explosives on christmas day, the system has failed in a potentially disastrous way. >> a battlon the high seas -- activists say their high-tech boat is broken in half by a japanese whaling vessel. pregnant personals -- prisoners the shackled while giving birth. standard practice in the u.s. but is it time to change? house know is bringing much of the u.k. to a total halt -- how snow is bringing much of the u.k. to a total halt. it is midday in london, it o'clock p.m. in tokyo and 7:00 a.m. in washington where intelligent chiefs will this morning begin to make amends after stinging criticism from president obama that they failed to stop last month's attempted to bomb an american airliner. the director of national intelligence dennis blair says the intelligence community had to boost efforts to prevent new mr. obama had earlier told senior officials that
that time frame of longer 2011-2012 and that's what every bank in america wants to be in. they're the only one. >> jim, good to see you again. >> good to see you, partner. >> thank you very much. watch the show 6:00 and 11:00 eastern tonight. that's it for "street signs." thank you very much for watching. "closing bell" begins in just a moment with an all-star cast from here, davos, and indeed cnbc's global headquarters. from this team thank you for watching. stay tuned for the big one. >>> history or hype? is the month of january really a good predictor of stock market performance and what should investors do based on this month's trade? live from the new york stock exchange, this is the final and most important hour of the trading day. >>> and good afternoon, everybody. welcome to the "closing bell." iful scott wapner live here on the floor the new york stock exchange. michelle? >> hi, scott, i am michelle caruso-cabrera at the cnbc global headquarters. ge is wrapping up on a downnote. as january goes, so goes the rest of the year. but here's some contradictory stats that might help you
explosives and directed him to attack that plane headed for america. >> glor: i'm jeff glor. also tonight, the new front in the war on mirk. security camera video captures the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old just months after the killing of another student from the same chicago high school. and whale mystery-- why are these giants of the deep massing off california in greater numbers than ever before? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with jeff glor. >> glor: good evening. the president today clearly laid the blame for the foiled christmas day airline bombing attempt on al qaeda militants in yemen, and he said the u.s. is stepping up aid to yemen's embattled government. also, cbs news has learned the u.s. is playing a more direct role in yemen's anti-terror war than previously acknowledged. more on that shortly, but first we begin our coverage this even with our chief white house correspondent chip reid who is traveling with the president in hawaii. chip, good evening. >> reporter: well, good evening, jeff. the president did not mince words. for the first time, h
, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. welcome to "worldfocus." i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the global economy and news of the key economic barometer, unemployment. in this country, the government said today it held steady at 10% last month as moyers cut 85,000 jobs which was more than expected. the news was disappointing in europe. in the 16 countries that used the euro as their currency, the jobless wrought was also 10%. in this case, for the month of november, up from 9.9% in october. analysts say it could approach 11% by the end of the year. the highest unemployment rate was in latvia. 22.3%. followed by spain at 19.4 on the other side of the spectrum, the lowest unemployment rate was in the netherlands at 3.9%, followed by austria at 5.5%. as the global economy tries to recover, europe is important because five countries, germany, france, the united kingdom, italy and spain are among the world's top ten econ
viewers to understand is the fact that total debt in america is, in fact, the not dproeg. it's a widely spread belief that all debt in america is growing out of control. in reality, the private sector is contracting faster than the government is spending and i think this is reducing the amount of dollars in circulation. when you reduce the supply, you drive up the price. >> very interesting, emil. we're going to leave it there for now and you'll be with us throughout the hour. right now, let's get you caught up on some of the big stories we've been following around the globe. president obama's chances of passing health care reform suffer a major setback as scott brown, republican, wins the senate seat held by ted kennedy in massachusetts. democrats may not have enough time now to resolve differences between the house and the senate health care bill and get new cost estimates before brown is sworn in. that leaves house democrats with the unpalatable option of trying to pass a senate bill that many disagree with. that stinging defeat in the senate comes on the one year anniversary of pres
and intelligence, law enforcement, and security committees have the tools they need to keep america statesafe. the investigation into the christmas day incident continues. we're learning more about the suspect. we know that he traveled to yemen, a country grappling with poverty. we know that this group and all canada in the iranian peninsula trained him -- and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula trained him. in recent -- and al qaeda in th e iranian peninsula trained him. even before christmas day, we have seen the results. training camps have been struck and leaders eliminated. all those involved in the attempted attack on christmas, they must know, you, too, will be held on account. with my oath came the solemn responsibility that i carry with me every moment of every day, the responsibility to protect the safety and security of the american people. on that day, i also made a clear path our nation is at war with [unintelligible] we will do whatever it takes to defeat them, even as leopold the values that has always distinguished america among nations. make no mistake. that is exactly what we
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